If your customer experience is excellent, you’re more likely to make more money, more often. It’s not uncommon to find yourself thinking up many weird and wonderful ways to improve the customers' experience. Many a time we’ve had some great ideas that then fizzle out due to cost of implementation or ROI uncertainty.

In this article, our Managing Director looks at 5 easy ways you can improve your customer experience without necessarily breaking the bank.


1) Give them a superior way to give feedback

Getting feedback from visitors to your site is vital. Order-based feedback like reviews are all well and good and a useful source of information. There’s the other kind of feedback though, about the website itself, which is harder to gather in decent quantities and often isn’t too specific.

One of our partners, Usabilla, have a great tool for gathering just that kind of feedback. It enables visitors to select the part of the screen they’re having trouble with (which could be due to a bug) and it also sends you a screenshot of the screen they’re seeing. Great, detailed website feedback that could save you £thousands in lost conversion rate.

Best of all it’s a simple Javascript implementation, so easy too.


2) Make it easy to get back to where they were

Recently viewed items is an underrated section for a website. Especially on mobile, where navigation and browsing are more tedious due to screen size, so shortcuts to the products they wanted or viewed last time is key.

Why not implement 'recently viewed' somewhere on your home page for returning visitors? Then they don’t need to recreate their path of browsing categories or searching to get back to the products they want. Simple!


3) Spot check calls/emails

If you have a call centre, this to me is a simple and necessary activity to implement. Do a random spot check of 20 orders a day. Give them a call (or if you have to, an email) to ask how they found your service and general experience. Do so as a real human being, not an automated reviews email. Not only will you gather great qualitative feedback from this route, your customers will also feel valued for being personally asked. After all, what’s more important than checking they had a great experience? Don’t let it go like John Lewis’ Trustpilot page.


4) Add third party social proof

Number 3 leads me straight into Number 4 - third party social proof. Having your own on site reviews is great for products. Not so great for service. A service like Trustpilot gives a third party voice to your customers and has the added benefit of being able to be displayed on your website as well as adding stars to your Google Ads.

The reason we’re passionate about third party reviews is trust - they’re much more trusted by customers as they believe they cannot be ‘gamed’ in the same way as retailer’s own review systems. And they’re right too. It forces a customer service focus.

One of our favourite implementations is along the bottom of almost every page on one of our client's sites - Life Style Sports in Ireland - take a look here. Let’s also remember that this shouldn’t be difficult to implement either as long as you have your order feeds in order.


5) Save their card details

This last one might be controversial. This is meant to be 5 easy- to-implement ways right? Saving card details is hard you say. There’s huge PCI compliance issues and much more besides. I don’t think that’s true. If you have a world class payment provider, saving card details should be a doddle. If it’s well implemented with your platform, it shouldn’t have too many issues either.

Many payment providers now support saving of card details on their servers to be charged by you using a token. This shifts the PCI risk to the payment provider. Other systems just drop their interface into your site like Stripe can, and save card details easily that way too. In my view there’s no excuse. If your payment provider is behind the times, it’s high time to shift to one that isn’t. Customer experience is key.


Summing up

Sometimes easy is best, especially on the customer experience front. As the above are so easy, which one are you going to pick to do first?


If this article's given you some food for thought and you'd like to pick my brains further, or perhaps you have a question, then drop me a note or give me a call 01829 260 600 and let's have a chat. 



Comment